Holiday 2022

From The Editor

Aloha!

Wow! Can you believe it has been an entire year since our last post?

So much has happened. We had a great beachfront retirement party for our friend John who just retired from Apple.  We traveled to The Big Island and Oahu for the first time in years. Kathy had remarkably successful eye surgery and I had major back surgery. I am a new man as a result. Unfortunately, we lost our beloved fur baby, Teddi. He was a beautiful and loving member of our ʻohana. He will be missed.

In spite of inflation and the outrageously high cost of living, Maui is still a great place to live. The weather has been a little strange and unpredictable and drought conditions persist although not as severe as in the last few years.

This time of year is when we should pause, be thankful for what we have, and celebrate with our family and friends.

So, be safe and be well. Health, happiness, and prosperity in the coming year.

In This Issue:                                                                                             

For The Musician                                              

Holiday Recipes:

     – Pizzelle

     – Rugelach

Inspiration

 

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For the Musician

Positive Grid Spark Amplifier

Traditional gig amplifiers are large, heavy and donʻt sound that good at low volume. Over the years I have spent a lot of time and a lot of money looking for a good practice amp that can produce great sound at low volume. Voila!

The Positive Grid Spark amp fits the bill perfectly. It is small but powerful and sounds great at any volume. It has a basket full of amp models and effects and can also be used as a Bluetooth speaker. Everything can be controlled from the free app. And at 40w it can be used for jamming and some small gigs.

Check out this Guitar Player Review

Back
Top Control Panel
AUDIO SPECIFICATIONS

FREQUENCY RANGE
20-20,000 Hz

STEREO/MONO
Stereo

MAXIMUM SOUND PRESSURE LEVEL
116 dB SPL @1m

CABINET PRINCIPLE
Bass-reflex

POWER AMPLIFIERS
40 Watt Class D Amplifier

SPEAKERS
Two – 4″ Custom Designed Speakers

TOTAL IMPEDANCE
4 ohms

CONTROLS AND CONNECTIVITY

TOP PANEL CONTROLS
Amp Type
Gain, Bass, Mid, Treble, Master, Mod, Delay, Reverb
Output Volume
Music Volume
Four Programmable Preset Buttons
Tap/Tuner Button

REAR PANEL
USB Port
AUX in
DC in

ONBOARD EFFECTS
33 Amp Models
43 Effects
(Noise Gate, Compressor, Distortion, Modulation/EQ, Delay, Reverb)

WIRED CONNECTIVITY
1/4″ Guitar Input
1/8″ Aux Input
1/8″ Headphone

WIRELESS CONNECTIVITY
Bluetooth Audio

USB AUDIO
USB Interface for Recording
1 In x 2 Out

PHYSICAL UNIT

DIMENSIONS
350 x 180 x 190 mm
(13.78 x 7.08 x 7.48 in)

WEIGHT
5.2 kg
11.46 lb

COVERING
Black Textured Vinyl
Pearl Textured Vinyl

GRILLE CLOTH
Custom Black/Brown

HANDLE
Removable Faux Leather Handle

This amp makes a great addition to your musical tool box.

JP

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Pizzelle

Brought to you by:  dimaggiofamily.com

PIZZELLE
Pronounced “pit-sel”

Pizzelles are the oldest known cookie.  It is generally believed they originated in the Abruzzo region of south-central Italy in ancient times to mark an annual celebration. Initially baked over an open fire with relatively simple but effective irons, the early pizzelles often were proudly embossed with the family crest or some hint of the village of origin.  The name comes from the Italian word pizze for round and flat. Pizzelle makers are typically called irons, because the first ones were just that- irons that were forged by blacksmiths for the local women.

Pizzelle Iron
Cucina Pizzelle Iron

In some parts of Italy, the irons were embossed with family crests and passed down to each generation. Over time it became tradition to use pizzelles to celebrate any holiday or festive occasion, but inevitably there were pizzelles for everyone at Christmas and Easter.  In addition, today they are often found at Italian weddings, alongside other traditional pastries such as cannoli and traditional Italian cookies

 

Traditional Italian Pizzelles

  • 3 eggs, room temperature
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • ½ cup butter melted and cooled
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ½ tsp. anise extract
  • 1 ¾ cups flour

Preparation

In large mixing bowl, beat eggs and sugar.  Add cooled butter, vanilla and anise.  Sift flour and baking powder together and add to egg mixture.   The batter should be stiff enough to be dropped by spoon.  It can also be refrigerated and used later.  Place 1 heaping teaspoon batter on each grid and bake according to directions for your Pizzelle iron.  To keep pizzelles crisp, store in an airtight container.

Two pizzelle may be sandwiched with cannoli cream or hazelnut spread.

Pizzelle Roller
Pizzelle Cone Roller

 

Pizzelle, while still warm, can be rolled using a wooden dowel to create cannoli shells or shaped into cones for ice cream.

Happy Holidays!

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Rugelach

Brought to you by:  toriavey.com

Ahhh, rugelach. You’d be hard-pressed to find a Jewish dessert that is more beloved than sweet, flaky rugelach. Yiddish for “little twists” or “rolled things,” rugelach have become a popular dessert in America, enjoyed by Jews and non-Jews alike. They descend from an Eastern European pastry known as kipfel, which is a croissant-like cookie made with flour, butter, sour cream, sugar, and yeast. Sometimes kipfel are filled with fruit or nuts, sometimes not. In the early 20th century, American Jewish cooks took the concept of kipfel and added cream cheese to the dough, resulting in the delicious rugelach we know and love today.

Rugelach are often served on Jewish holidays like Hanukkah and Shavuot, though of course they can (and should!) be made throughout the year. Our family typically serves them during Rosh Hashanah, when sweet foods are made to signify a sweet new year. The rolled shape is similar to the spiral challah served at Rosh Hashanah, which symbolizes the cyclical nature of a year. Some people roll rugelach into a strudel-like form, then slice it to make spiral-shaped cookies. In today’s blog, I’m going to share the method for creating the more popular crescent-shaped cookies.

While rugelach filling recipes vary greatly, the dough most American bakers use for rugelach is pretty standard, comprised of equal amounts of flour, cream cheese, and butter. I add a bit of sour cream, sugar, and salt to mine because I like to shake things up. I’m a rugelach rebel! Actually, many people use sour cream in their dough instead of cream cheese, which is more similar to the way kipfel are made. I like to add both because I love the way the dough bakes up– crispy on the outside, soft and flaky and scrumptious on the inside. You’ll love it too. Promise.

I wish I could say that this recipe is healthy, but alas, it is just the opposite. That is, unless you consider fat, sugar, and starch to be healthy– and they might be, depending on how you look at it. After all, tasty treats in moderation are certainly good for the soul. I don’t recommend futzing with the recipe too much by substituting lowfat ingredients, since it’s the fat in the dairy products that ultimately makes these cookies so flaky and delicious. If you do try modifying the recipe for health reasons, let me know how it turns out for you– I’d love to hear! For the rest of us making full-fat rugelach, don’t worry about it too much. These cookies bake up fairly small, so you can treat yourself to a couple and not feel too terribly guilty. Life is there to be lived, am I right??

Recommended Products

DOUGH INGREDIENTS

  • 2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter
  • 8 oz. cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp granulated sugar

FILLING INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 cups chopped walnuts or pecans
  • 1 1/4 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup berry preserves (raspberry, strawberry, or blackberry)
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar

EGG WASH INGREDIENTS

  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp water
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon

YOU WILL ALSO NEED

Food processor or electric mixer, plastic wrap, parchment paper, cookie sheets, rolling pin and surface, skillet, 9 inch cake pan (optional)

Servings: 40 large rugelach or 60 small rugelach

Kosher Key: Dairy

Chop cold butter and cream cheese into smaller pieces. Put pieces into your food processor along with sour cream, flour, salt, and sugar. Pulse together ingredients until a crumbly dough forms and begins to fall away from the sides of the processor. Don’t overprocess; the dough should look crumbly, like cottage cheese.

Rugelach I

If you don’t have a food processor: let the butter and cream cheese come to room temperature. Using a stand mixer or hand mixer, cream the butter and cream cheese together with the sour cream. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, salt, and sugar. Slowly add the dry mixture to the wet mixture, mixing constantly, until dough holds together and begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl. Don’t overmix. Pour dough onto a lightly floured rolling surface and form into a rough ball shape.

Divide the ball into four equal pieces and form those pieces into rough balls.

Rugelach IV

Cover each ball with plastic and place in the refrigerator. Refrigerate dough balls for at least 1 1/2 hours, for up to 48 hours.

In a skillet, toast the chopped nuts over medium heat until fragrant.

Pour the toasted nuts into a food processor along with the chocolate chips, berry preserves, and brown sugar. Pulse together until a thick, coarse paste forms.

Rugelach VI

Combine the cinnamon and sugar in a small bowl.  Beat your egg wash with water.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  Lightly flour your rolling surface and rolling pin. Take one portion of the dough out of the refrigerator (keep the rest of the dough cold until ready to use). Roll out the dough to about 1/8 inch thickness. You may need to use the rolling pin to pound out the dough a bit at the beginning; the dough will be very firm and cold, but will become more pliable as it starts to warm. Just keep rolling with firm, even pressure.

Lift the dough gently from the rolling surface (it may stick a bit) and re-flour your surface beneath the dough.

Replace the dough onto the newly refloured surface. Use a round 9″ cake pan as a guide to make a nice, smooth imprint of a circle in the dough.

Cut the dough into a large circle, following the shape of the cake pan. If you don’t have a cake pan, just guesstimate the size of the circle and cut it as smoothly as you can.

Form the trimmed excess dough into a small ball. Wrap it in plastic and reserve in the refrigerator, adding to the ball with each batch that is made.

Take 1/4 of the filling (about 4 tbsp) and place it in the center of the circle. Spread it very thin across the surface of the dough; a thick layer of filling will make your cookies expand and burst. You can use your fingers to make the spreading easier; I like to use my palm to flatten and even out the filling. Leave about an inch around the edges of the circle.

Cut the circle into 8 equal triangles by first cutting the circle in half…then quarters…then halve the quarters to make eighths.

If you prefer to make smaller bite-sized cookies, divide each quarter into three to make 12 equal triangles.

Rugelach XIX

 

 

 

Roll each triangle, starting from the wide flat end and rolling towards the narrow point.

Press the end point into the cookie to secure it. Place the rolled cookies onto a parchment lined cookie sheet, end point down. Leave an inch between the cookies, as they will expand slightly during baking.

Rugelach XX

When you are ready to bake, brush the top of each cookie with egg wash then sprinkle lightly with cinnamon sugar.

Rugelach XXI

 

Rugelach XXII

Place cookies in the oven and let them bake for about 25 minutes, or until golden brown.

Rugelach XX

 

 

 

 

 

Roll out your next batch of cookies while this batch is baking. When the cookies are golden brown, remove from the oven and let them cool on a wire rack.

If you’d prefer to bake more than one batch of cookies at a time, you can store batches of rolled unbaked cookies (without egg wash) on a cookie sheet in the refrigerator. Egg wash and dust them with sugar just prior to placing them in the oven.

When you’re finished making cookies from the four dough balls, make a smooth ball from the leftover dough trimmings you’ve reserved and roll it out to make your fifth batch.

These cookies taste amazing served warm and fresh from the oven. They’ll keep for a few days in a tightly sealed container. You can rewarm them in the microwave if you want to. Also, feel free to use this dough recipe with other rugelach fillings. If you’re using a fruit-only filling, make sure it’s an oven safe variety for pastry baking. Using simple jam or preserves alone (without firming them up with other ingredients) tends to make a runny filling that flows out of the cookies, which makes for a goopy mess. If you’ve never made these cookies before, start with my filling– it’s really yummy, promise!

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Inspiration

How to Make Feeling Inspired a Priority

As I was reading the UCLA Fall 2022 magazine, I came across an article titled High Anxiety by Dan Gordon that caught my interest. I assumed it was another discussion on how real post-covid/high inflation anxiety (PCHIA) is, with perhaps some new suggestions on how to handle the anxiety. It begins:

With its persistent grip, COVID-19 has exacted an unimaginable toll on all of us. It’s taken lives and livelihoods, canceled celebrations, isolated us from family, friends, and co-workers. Coupled with a news cycle dominated by ceaseless reports of global war, mass shootings and a nation seemingly hopelessly divided, we shouldn’t be surprised that we’re all dealing with increasing amounts of crippling anxiety.

Yes, indeed.

The author included familiar suggestions that are good to remember:

  • Remember You Have Choices
  • Face Things
  • Deep Breaths
  • Exert Some Control
  • Keep it Routine
  • Get Outside
  • Flip the Script

I wanted to further pursue these suggestions to see if I could discover new techniques to help tamp down the anxiety. I encountered several validating statistics from the American Psychological Association that mentioned that among the (PCHIA) symptoms are “forgetfulness, inability to concentrate, and difficulty making decisions.”

So I felt a bit relieved that I’m not losing my cognitive abilities, but still wanted to learn more about how to handle this anxiety. This led to a study of Future Tripping. This, in turn, leads us back to Mindfulness.  Wikipedia’s definition of mindfulness is:

“the practice of purposely bringing one’s attention to the present-moment experience without evaluation.”

 My interpretation is that inherent in this definition is the concept of Future Tripping. Future Tripping is also called anticipatory anxiety. It’s part of the human condition of looking into the imagined future and anticipating the outcome. The practice of future tripping increases anxiety, however, and when we’re anxious, chances are we’ll anticipate the worst possible outcome. So future tripping is a good thing to avoid. We can do that by practicing mindfullness.

In my pursuit of more help on this subject, I discovered a fascinating concept that I had not heard of before: Searching not just for serenity, or peace, but more importantly, for inspiration.

In Gabby Bernsteinʻs blog article Beware of Future Trippingshe reiterates the idea that the fastest way to release an outcome and the pressure of expectations is to reconnect with the present.  Part of her suggestion to do “one small thing each day” she mentions that the purpose is not only to focus on now, but to pursue inspiration. When we change our expectation of “what will happen when I do this,” to “what can I do to feel inspired,” the one small thing each day opens up endless opportunities for positive, surprising, and self-caring outcomes.

I could go on, this concept facinates me so much. But instead, I’ll suggest that you check out her website for a four-step framework for making feeling inspired a priority.

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Down The Road

The Next Adventure? Maybe

 

2022 Jayco Pinnacle 32RLTS

Ever thought about living on the road? For me, some of the best years were those spent travelling the country in a 1969 VW Bug, a truck, and, the biggest adventure of all, on my Harley.

The events of the last few years have amplified the meaning of time and how precious it is. Every day wasted can never be recovered. So, if you have a dream and it’s strong enough, there is no better time than the present to start planning and working toward its implementation.

Living full time on the road is a pretty big decision which will require many important discussions between my wife Kathy and myself. But if we decide to move forward on this it will be sometime in early 2025.

I have been doing a great deal of research regarding equipment, logistics, and the many details, big and small, that need to be ironed out. This is all part of the fun and mystery.

After extensive research I have decided that a Jayco Pinnacle 32RLTS fifth wheel is the best choice since it offers all the comforts of home in a well thought out package. This, coupled to a Ram 3500 Heavy Duty truck will provide the ideal combination for this very big adventure.

Pinnacle Interior
Pinnacle Floor Plan

 

Ram 3500 Heavy Duty

I would like to set a goal of touring 49 states in 48 months. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

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‘Tis The Season 2021

From The Editor

Aloha!

As 2021 comes to a close, now would be a good time to reflect on all that has happened in the last year. From an attempted coup to a resurgence of Covid. As we always do, we hung together and weathered the storm

Here in Hawaii it looked like we dodged a bullet. But alas the Delta variant knocked us for a loop and sent our economy into another tailspin.

This time of year is when we should pause, be thankful for what we have, and celebrate with our family and friends, in person if possible.

So my friends, be safe and be well. Health, happiness, and prosperity in the coming year.

Click to play Auld Lang Syne

 

In This Issue:                                                                                             

–Down The Road     

-It’s Not Over ‘Till It’s Over                                                            

–I Never Knew I Needed This

-Free Stuff

 

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It’s Not Over ’Til It’s Over – The Continuing Pandemic

Aloha,

Well, THIS caught my eye. I was hoping that by this time, December 2021, I would be able to write an article about “Whew, that was close! Now we can get back to normal.” If only. . .

This last almost-two years has been unbelievable – impossible to describe easily or painlessly. From one level of stress to the next, smothered in conflict, heartbreak, and sadness, and just plain denial when it’s gotten to be too much, we’re in danger of sagging. We never give up, but we may sag.

The uncomfortable reality is that it’s not over yet. We still must take control of how we internalize all of this negativity, find ways to lift the heaviness, and, depending on our circumstances, keep moving on to the best of our abilities. That’s the key; we must keep moving.

So when I came across the following article from the Cleveland Clinic dated September 13, 2021, I thought that the advice presented was extremely helpful. I will summarize some of the main points in the article, but I suggest that reading the entire article would be even more helpful.

The article presents 10 ways to manage stress as the pandemic lingers:

  1. Take (some) control
  2. Be in the present
  3. Stop comparing
  4. Keep moving forward
  5. Take a break from decisions (my favorite)
  6. Find silver linings
  7. Connect
  8. Find new ways to de-stress
  9. Work through your feelings
  10. Get help if you need it

I hope these topics have piqued your interest to read the full article on the Cleveland Clinic site. Think of it this way, if nothing else, reading through the material will keep your mind busy for awhile. It feels validating, at least, to know we’re not alone in this discomfort. Personally, the 2 points I find the most helpful are to Connect and Keep Moving Forward.

Together we will make it through. Here’s to a new year with new beginnings.

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I Never Knew I Needed This

DeWalt 20v Inflator

Did you ever go out to your vehicle only to find that a tire was low on air and you’re miles from the nearest service station? Or ever want to use your bicycle only to find the tire deflated from lack of use?

There are dozens of portable compressors out there but I found this one to be particularly powerful and effective.  I don’t have to drag out my big compressor everytime I want to top off the tires on my vehicles or bicycles.

DeWalt 20v Tire Inflator

I thought the package was a little expensive but after using this tool for a few months I wonder how I got along without it.

JP

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Hawaii License Plate

Hawaii inspired art, art wear, music and other stuff